The 3 helpful tips when checking your BMN Score 

Writing a score is a slow and time consuming task. A lot of time will be spent looking and analysing every miniute detail so it’s important to regularly go back and check the bigger picture. Here I have put together a few essential points to check the score can be read fluidly.  These can be used on a daily basis (at the end of each section) or when checking a complete score. 

1. Count your number of bars

This is a very easy and quick check but that is so easily overlooked. By counting the number of bars in the Benesh score and making this matches the music score. This is important in all occasions but especially if the music is complexe or if the dancers counts change regularly (fast to slow counts). As you are checking this keep a look out for the number of beats per bar that no “half beat/”and” count” has been omitted. 

Here you can see Benesh Notator Amanda Eyles in rehearsal cross referencing her BMN score to her music score on the stand in front of her


2. Can you follow the below stave story line?

Make sure the below stave story line reads through properly that you are not missing any direction, travel or location signs. 

That brackets that have been open are now closed  for turns, promenades,… and also if you are notating people moving from standing, sitting, lying down and upside down. 

This is specially important for multistave scores that we know the relationship between performers

This is an extract from a Don Quixote written by Benesh Notator Lorraine Gregory, you can easily follow the below stave travel and placing of the performer

3. Body cancellations 

This is another easily forgotten item to have drawn a beautiful épaulement or bend in the body and forget to cancel it when it has returned to neutral. 

When re-reading your instave information keep a look out for supporting legs that might have been omitted.

This is an example of how Notation works as published by the Benesh Institute where you can notice there is a lot of body movement involved


I have purposefully kept this list to 3 points only: one above stave, below stave and in stave information which I felt was the minimum. And there are many more things that could be checked. Please leave a comment if you feel it’s important to add other tips.

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